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Food in South Korea

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Food in South Korea

Holly Cosgray, Staff Writer

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As you’re sitting down to watch the 2018 Winter Olympics, you’re probably eating something. Whether that be nachos, pizza, hamburgers, or wings, it’s probably a “traditional” American meal. However, the athletes in Pyeongchang are surrounded by a totally different culture, and if there’s one thing to be expectant of a different culture it’s that there will be different food. Here are just a couple of the traditional South Korean dishes your Team USA olympians might be sampling right now.
The most famous food in South Korea is Kimchi. Kimchi is a spicy and sour dish made up from fermented vegetables. The common ingredient is cabbage, but there are also various other ingredients. South Koreans consider dinner incomplete if there is no Kimchi.
Another popular food in South Korea is bibimbap, a bowl of mixed rice with seasoned and sauteed vegetables, mushrooms, beef, soy sauce, gochujang (chili pepper taste) and a fried egg. The ingredients found in bimbimag vary by region. Jeonju, Tongyeong, and Jinju have the most famous versions of bibimbap.
For dessert a common dish in the summertime is Subak Hwachae. Subak Hwachae is commonly made with various fruits or sweet drinks served as a dessert or snack. The base of the drink is water sweetened with honey, syrup, or sugar. Within the sweetened water is balled watermelon, honeydew, and rice cake balls. There is also two cups of ginger ale, as well as three tablespoons of Korean drinking vinegar.
The United States Olympic athletes are certainly not focused on the traditional cuisine of the host country, but hopefully, after they are finished competing, the athletes will have time to try some native Korean food before heading back to the States.

About the Writer
Holly Cosgray, Staff writer

Holly will be a senior at Delphi and in her first year on the Parnassus staff. She is also involved in Interact, Spanish Club, NHS, Student Council and...

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