People forget to appreciate wisdom

Back to Article
Back to Article

People forget to appreciate wisdom

Nickolas Roberson, Columnist

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






How often do you contemplate the stories and tales of youth from your grandparents? How often do you truly try to understand the meaning behind the stories of their childhood accomplishments, mistakes, and even tomfoolery? When they bestow these stories upon you, do you even care to listen? There is an issue prevalent in society, and especially within my generation: people forget to appreciate wisdom.

I want you to think back now; think back to your younger years. Think back to cool spring mornings with their golden glow, fresh pancakes and bacon wafting their aromas throughout a cozy house, to warm summer nights under starry skies, prickly grass tickling your toes as the adults sit around an embracing bonfire together. These times were spent relaxing, playing, and exploring the world that was open before you; you had near boundless freedom to examine and figure out your surroundings, both good and bad. Yet, many of us do not fully appreciate the guiding hands that were there; many times, we did not even notice them. 

And as you remember yourself sitting near that slow roasting bonfire, lightning bugs swirling around, do you remember the stories from your grandparents? You’ve definitely heard the recounts of their lives before, with the long walks grandma had to take to school in the chilly autumn months, the aging cars and pickup trucks your father and grandpa worked tirelessly on with grease-covered, calloused hands. You listened, yes, but you only took these stories at face value, did you not? What about the deeper meaning behind these stories? What lessons were they trying to teach?

Before she passed, my great grandmother would have a family dinner at her tiny house every summer. Family members from all over would come, many of whom I would only see at this special dinner. As everyone brought in their dishes, from casseroles and hams to cakes and brownies, my grandmother would sit a the head of the table for the entire day, talking to absolutely everyone. She would tell stories and recount memories of her past and the family’s, and unfortunately, I never fully appreciated these as a child, much like everyone else when they heard such stories from their grandparents. Yet we must realize that all of these stories were attempts to guide as along the somewhat unpredictable, winding paths of life. Life lessons were contained within these tidbits of memories, a near boundless amount of wisdom being imparting upon all of us. Thus, the next time your grandmother or father tells a story from his or her past, pay special attention to every detail, and discern the real reason why they’re imparting such powerful wisdom upon you.